Friday, January 28, 2011

January Thaw Round Up

Yet another round up with Laura:

You know what's the future, friends and foes? Children. Especially children who may grow up to be Lisbeth Salander. They may get pushed along that road by having to read YA by Stephenie Meyer's publicist, or, alternately, by being in the Oliver Twist workhouse. Oh, yeah. They discovered that.

Other mysteries have been revealed as well, like the author of O, and how Nicholas Sparks wrote his first novel. Inquiring minds want to know! Inquiring minds will also get the chance to read John Lennon's letters, find out if financial types read, and see how novels come to term with the Internet. A mysterious man also got a book deal based on his academic mercenary past, although what he could have to say beyond his original article is beyond me.

Also beyond me: the future. Luckily, the future is now, as e-books are outselling paperbacks on Amazon. Everybody panic! Especially since agents and publishers have different opinions about e-book royalties. It's like dogs and cats living together (in the future). You can always trade in your used Kindle for print books. Or keep your Kindle, get some Amazon singles, and tremble at the price sensitivity of e-book readers.

So untangle those plots, read your super cool new TED books, and defend Jane Eyre to the death, gentle readers.


  1. I'm embracing the e-book explosion. My very first publication was a short story from an e-publisher, so I've been on the bandwagon for years.

    Terry's Place
    Romance with a Twist--of Mystery

  2. I'm still having a difficult time reading on a device rather than a book. Will persevere though. My books now ebooks are selling so others are doing fine with e-reader devices.

  3. My first publication was also an e-pub, so I'm not fighting the e-boom, but I still love my paper books and I'll never get rid of them. An author today can't disregard e-books and succeed, though. I use my e-reader to read books I review for a magazine, which is a better alternative than reading a tome on a computer. I'm used to my e-reader, but will be against them if we ever have to put up with ads in novels. Hopefully, that will never happen.